The Cost of Typing ‘Big Dick’ During an Overwatch League Match: $1,000

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The administrators of Blizzard’s official in-house Overwatch League have taken their first disciplinary actions of the year, fining two players a total of $2,000 (one grand each) for “inappropriate chat during a league match.” The players in question, Jung-Won “Lastro” Mun of the Los Angeles Valiant and Dong-Jun “Rascal” Kim of the San Francisco Shock, exchanged expletives in what they both thought was a hidden chat that, unfortunately for them, could actually be seen by the thousands of viewers watching at home. The expletives in question? “Sex” and “big dick.”

As can be seen in the screenshots below, Jung-Won “Lastro” Mun said both “sex” and “big dick,” while Dong-Jun “Rascal” Kim replied with his own instance of “big dick,” followed by a Korean onomatopoeia for the sound one makes when trembling with fear. Other players in the match responded with surprise and laughter, laying out reams of question marks and extended, all-caps LMAOs in response. Once Lastro realized that the chat was actually being broadcast to viewers, he followed up his raunchy non sequiturs with “sry sry sry sry” and then “srysry srysrysrysreysrysrysrysrysrysry,” in the most “Sorry. Im sorry. Im trying to remove it” moment of the esports year.

After the match but prior to yesterday’s $1,000 fine being levied against him, Lastro issued the following statement on Twitter: “I thought the viewers could not see the match chat because everyone was typing in it. I wrote it as a joke, although I should not have done it regardless of whether the viewers could see the match chat or not. I will make sure something like this never happens again. I apologize to all the fans and OWL viewers.”


As far as Overwatch League disciplinary actions go, Lastro and Rascal’s gaffs rank pretty low comparatively. In the past, multiple members of the Overwatch League have been penalized for using homophobic slurs, for sharing memes about the atomic bombings of Japan during World War 2, for overt racism during official streams and on social media, and for other toxic behaviors and activities that closely mirror the toxic behavior of non-professional Overwatch players.

It’s convenient that Blizzard’s official Overwatch League discipline tracker only shows the actions taken against players who are still under contract, thus scrubbing the “official” history books clean of the most egregious offenders. There is no mention, for instance, of the $4,000 fine and four-game suspension levied against former Dallas Fuel player Félix “xQc” Lengyel for his repeated use of a racist emote during an official broadcast.

Given a choice between the two, I’ll take someone succumbing to the deeply male instinct to say the stupidest thing you can think of rather than, say, overt hate speech directed at an openly gay player on the other team (another of Félix Lengyel’s #1 top-40 hits prior to his expulsion from the league), but I shouldn’t have to make this choice in the first place. Blizzard has done absolutely nothing to mature the atmosphere around Overwatch, or to quash the toxicity that has plagued both its stable of professional talent and its core users since the game first launched in 2016.

Via
Kotaku
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Jordan Mallory

Jordan Mallory has spent more than a decade in the games industry and is now severely ill-equipped to work in other fields as a result. Right now he's eating generic Frosted Flakes out of a red party cup and wondering why he chose to rewrite his bio at 5:31 a.m.

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