Ash’s Pikachu Gigantamax Evolved in the Anime and Was a Big Boy Again

He is very large and very strong.

We can call him Thicc Pikachu, Thiccachu, Big Boi Pikachu, but whatever it is you call him, Gigantamax Pikachu made waves when he was first revealed just before Pokemon Sword and Shield came out. This form, which only a specific Pikachu in the games can take, lets him grow into a 68-foot-tall version of himself, with a long tail and a rounder, chubbier body shape reminiscent of his original design when he debuted back in 1998.

Today, Ash Ketchum’s Pikachu, the lovable franchise mascot in the anime series, finally achieved this form in episode 1098 that aired in Japan. In the episode, Ash and Pikachu are battling Leon, the Galar region’s champion, and while we won’t spoil the result, there are a few clips of Pikachu in this form circulating online.

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Fans are celebrating the return of “Fat Pikachu,” since Pikachu’s appearance has been slimmed down over the years as designs have changed. Here’s a comparison between his debut in the series and his more current look:

In general, the Pokemon anime has been hesitant to alter Pikachu’s form too much (he is the mascot and brand recognition is a thing, I suppose), opting to make a whole episode about how he didn’t want to evolve into Raichu in the very early days of the show, so we’ll see just how often Pikachu revisits Gigantamax evolution as the season goes on.

In other Pokemon news, Nintendo and Game Freak launched Pokemon Home at the end of January, which will finally let players bring older Pokemon to Sword and Shield and just generally act as a place to collect your Pokemon from across all the games. While the service does have a monthly fee, and seems geared toward the most meticulous of Pokemon trainers who have hundreds and thousands of the creatures to keep up with, there is a free alternative for those of us who just want to get a handful of Pokemon from the old games to the current ones.

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Kenneth Shepard

Kenneth is a Georgia-based writer who still periodically cries about the Mass Effect trilogy years after it concluded.

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