122

POSTS

0

NEWS

19

FEATURES

0

GUIDES

Gretchen Felker-Martin


‘Crimes of the Future’ Review: Eat Trash, Be Free

After more than twenty years, David Cronenberg returns to the world of sci-fi body horror without missing a beat. Amid the rotting bones of a nameless, placeless coastal city, the performance artists Caprice (Léa Seydoux) and Saul Tenser (Viggo Mortensen) collaborate in public surgical extractions of Saul’s “novel organs,” glands…

READ MORE >
Crimes of the Future

REVIEWS

‘The Northman’ Review: Go North, Young Man

Men howl and stamp around a roaring fire, dragging animal cries up from deep within their bellies. A son and his father snarl and snap at one another on all fours in a secret burrow deep under the earth, then lap hallucinogenic water from bowls laid out by a masked…

READ MORE >
The Northman

TV/FILM

‘Piggy’ Review: A Tender but Uneven Cut

To see a fat woman on the silver screen as something other than a dowdy matron or pitiable joke is in and of itself worth remarking on, and Carlota Pereda’s Piggy affords its protagonist, Sara (Laura Galán) more depth and complexity than the vast majority of films which deign to…

READ MORE >
Piggy

TV/FILM

‘Framing Agnes’ Review: Slight, but Heartfelt

Transhood, The Trans List, Disclosure, No Ordinary Man — the last decade is littered with documentaries on the present and recent past of transgender culture, and without exception these films feature at least one talking head decrying the salacious public and journalistic fixation on gender reassignment surgery, reminding viewers that…

READ MORE >
Framing Agnes

REVIEWS

Gretchen Felker-Martin’s Top 10 Movies of 2021

10. The Green Knight David Lowery’s The Green Knight tells a thoroughly medieval story of masculine weakness and inadequacy first and foremost by hurling the aesthetics of the period out the nearest window. Solar crowns and fractal dresses, camera obscuras burning pinhole likenesses into sheets of lead, architecture equal parts…

READ MORE >
The Green Knight

TV/FILM

‘House of Gucci’ Review: Needs Letting Out

Ridley Scott seems to have discovered the secret to making Jared Leto palatable: render him unrecognizable, make sure everything he says is incomprehensible, and limit his time on-screen to no more than ten minutes before reassuring the audience that he’s dead during the closing titles. There’s a very here-it-is-there-it-goes sensibility…

READ MORE >
House of Gucci

REVIEWS

‘Mad God’ Review: Holy Shit

I don’t know that I’ve ever seen a movie with more onscreen defecation than Phil Tippett’s Mad God. This should in no way be construed as a criticism. Captive giants, hooded and wired up to machines which electrocute them repeatedly, shit freely into funnels which empty into the mouth of…

READ MORE >
Mad God

REVIEWS

‘Benedetta’ Review: Sex, Lies, and God

Which is preferable, the tangible disappointment of truth or the hollow ecstasy of fantasy? Paul Verhoeven’s Benedetta is less interested in coming down on either side than it is in showing the inextricability of these two states, the psychosexual points of contact at which they interpenetrate and grow together. The…

READ MORE >
Benedetta

REVIEWS

‘Dune’ Take Two: We’re Dune Fine, Thanks

If you like watching Zendaya turn around and stare into the camera in slow motion, boy have I got a movie for you. Denis Villeneuve’s Dune: Part I is chock full of little visions like this. A bloodied hand surrounded by billowing fabric. A guy saying cryptically, “I will teach…

READ MORE >
Dune

REVIEWS

‘Titane’ Review: There’s No Place Like Chrome

There’s what you see, and then there’s what you get. Julia Ducournau’s Titane comes out of the gate as a kind of latter-day Crash (the Cronenberg autoerotic fuckfest, not the insipid Oscar-winner of the same name), preoccupied with the places where trauma and sexuality meet and become hopelessly entangled, raw…

READ MORE >
Titane

REVIEWS

‘The Many Saints of Newark’ Review: Tony, Tony, Tony!

“That’s the guy,” says the ghost of Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli). “My uncle Tony. The guy I went to hell for.” It’s Cristopher’s shade who narrates Sopranos series creator David Chase’s The Many Saints of Newark, his first return to the world of organized crime since the infamous 2007 cut…

READ MORE >
The Many Saints of Newark

REVIEWS

‘Annette’ Review: All Dolled Up

Considering how bonkers Annette sounds on paper — a musical by Leos Carax, of Holy Motors fame, in which Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard have a wooden mannequin for a baby and the guy from Big Bang Theory plays piano — it’s astonishing how tedious it is to actually watch.…

READ MORE >
Annette

REVIEWS

‘Candyman’ Review: The Writing on the Wall

Candyman, Nia DaCosta’s 2021 sequel to Bernard Rose’s acclaimed 1992 film of the same name, boasts three screenwriters — Dacosta herself, Jordan Peele, and Peele’s frequent collaborator Win Rosenfeld — and its script, which jumps back and forth between rushed and overwritten, shows the strain of that redundancy. There’s laundromat…

READ MORE >
Candyman

REVIEWS

‘The Green Knight’ Review: Color, Costumes, Charisma

Nearly everything in David Lowery’s The Green Knight is bound up in circles. The painted disc in the puppeteer’s booth reflecting the march of the seasons, fisheye shots of a forest verge in which the trees form a rounded curtain wall against the outside world, the solar crowns of King…

READ MORE >
The Green Knight

REVIEWS

‘Evangelion 3.0+1.0: Thrice Upon a Time’ Review: A Bang and a Whimper

The Rebuild of Evangelion movies, which together constitute a subsequent and/or parallel timeline to the original series and End of Evangelion, finally culminate in the appropriately convoluted and gratifyingly peaceful Thrice Upon a Time. Where 2012’s You Can (Not) Redo broke from its constant blistering action only to spend short…

READ MORE >
Thrice Upon a Time

REVIEWS

‘Zola’ Review: Shocks Over Substance

A hotel stick-up, an unstable boyfriend hurling himself dramatically off a balcony, pole-dancers speaking in tongues as they pray to Jesus to send them well-endowed black men with credit scores of 840; Janicza Bravo’s Zola flits nimbly between the revolting and the absurd, but as it slithers across Florida from…

READ MORE >
Zola

REVIEWS

‘Pig’ Review: That’ll Do

There’s a clean, earnest simplicity to Michael Sarnoski’s Pig, a willingness to risk silliness by eschewing sarcasm and the sort of broad, obvious cuteness that so often characterizes a-man-and-his-animal films. Cage’s gruff, disheveled former chef Robin Feld and his unnamed pig have touching onscreen chemistry, but there’s no shot of…

READ MORE >
Pig

REVIEWS

‘Censor’ Review: A Cut Above

“If it’s the nation’s sanity they’re worried about, why don’t they stop slashing social services?” film censor Anne (Clare Perkins) mutters during a meeting on revised standards handed down by the Thatcher administration. It’s a biting line, and that it’s delivered by the film’s only black woman can hardly be…

READ MORE >
Censor

REVIEWS

‘Agnes’ Review: Exorcise This Movie From Your Watchlist

Mickey Reece’s Agnes invites comparison to Paolo Sorrentino’s The Young Pope/The New Pope practically from its opening moments. The posed group shots, the puckishly jarring title card, the conscientiously odd-looking Catholic faces scored to idiosyncratic soft rock — it’s all straight out of Sorrentino’s playbook, and it’s all sorely lacking his…

READ MORE >
Agnes

REVIEWS

‘Mortal Kombat’ Review: Bloody Simple

The CGI isn’t great, half the sets look like spray-painted styrofoam, and the tournament the characters spend the entire movie talking about never happens and appears to have no structure, set location, or administrative body attached to it, but all in all Simon McQuoid’s Mortal Kombat is a pretty good…

READ MORE >
Mortal Kombat

REVIEWS